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JUNE 2001- Contents

Culture
Kalash of Chitral Valley

Environment
Endangered medicinal herbs

Sports
Manchester getting ready
for 2002 Commonwealth Games

Health
Ayurveda's remedies for the heart

Films
Digital Cinema - the advent in India

Lifestyle
Tunday Kababi of Lucknow

Visual Arts
City of Djinns- Photo Album

People
The General's Haveli in Delhi

Travel & Adventure
Hidden Falls of Tibet

 

Editor's Note

 

the craft shop

the print gallery

 

 


 

the-south-asian.com                               June 2001

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Editor's Note

 

June began on a sad and tragic note - King Birendra of Nepal, his wife, brother and children lay slain - victims of a moment of madness. As June draws to an end, Bombay/Mumbai police stand alert outside cinema halls screening the film Ghadar, anticipating yet ready to avert another potential moment of madness. Have we then lost our ability for a dialogue? Is aggression really necessary as a  tool for communication? The answer, one hopes, is No. Last century saw some of the  'maddest' moments in history but it also left us with examples of worthiness of a dialogue. Germany unified. US and Japan, despite Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Pearl Harbour, are more than civil to each other - Americans drive Japanese cars, watch their big games on Sony/Panasonic screens, and love Sushi. In Japan, the high streets are stocked with highly visible American goods .

General Musharraf's coming visit to India is an opportunity for a much needed dialogue. The sub-continent has seen enough wrath and fury,  hatred and madness - fuelled by misguided and misinterpreted religious tenets and caste distinctions. The blood-thirsty battle cries emanating from small, insecure groups, ought to be silenced - they do not define national sentiment or mood. The region was one, its people were one - it is never too late to be friends. 

The next issue of the-south-asian.com will be the first Anniversary issue - carrying a small but significant story of friendship across the border - a story of old ties between three Battalions that fought as one, and then dispersed in different directions for different reasons - yet, they continue to celebrate their links and their past. That's all it takes - extending and reaching out for the other's hand.

 

Roopa Bakshi

 

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