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APRIL 2002 Contents

 

Travel 

 A Journey through Bhutan

 'Baikunth' - the mountain
 resort overlooking Kasauli in 
 Himachal Pradesh

 Literature

 At Home in the world

 Visual Arts

 Jatin Das - 4 decades of 
 passion

 Studio Potters

 Music

 Zakir Hussain - Compelling
 Beats

 
 Heritage

 Hakim Ajmal Khan's ancestral
 Sharif Manzil & Hindustani
 Dawakhana

 
 Environment 

 Eco-friendly Tyre furniture 

 Business & Economy

 Textiles of Pakistan

  Performing Arts

 'Fakir of Benares' -1922 French
 Opera revived in Delhi

 Films

 Revathy Menon's 'Mitr - my
 friend'

 Books

 The Power of Vastu Living

 'Knock at Every Alien Door'
 
- Serialization of an
 unpublished novel by
 Joseph Harris - Chapter 4

 People 

 Naveen Jindal

 


 
the craft shop

 the print gallery

 Books

 Silk Road on Wheels

The Road to Freedom

Enduring Spirit

Parsis-Zoroastrians of
India

The Moonlight Garden

Contemporary Art in Bangladesh

 

 

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JATIN DAS Ė Four decades of passion

by

Isidore Domnick Mendis

Art-jatin-1.jpg (51833 bytes)
 "... drawing is the essence of an artistís work" - Jatin Das

Jatin Das is at his artistic best depicting man-woman relationships. His human forms have a vibrant energy and an abundance of emotions. " Human predicament is my basic concern. I draw, paint and etch the human body, without any narrative, devoid of placement of time. The figures in my works do their own things," says Das. To mark his four decades as an artist, a retrospective exhibition of his drawings was held at Delhiís All India Fine Arts & Crafts Society.

Art-jatin-2.jpg (30727 bytes) Art-jatin-4.jpg (50382 bytes)
" Human predicament is my basic concern. I draw, paint and etch the human body, without any narrative, devoid of placement of time. The figures in my works do their own things," says Das.

He was one of the most amazing students of the batch of 1957 at Mumbaiís Sir J. J. School of Arts. The then 17-year-old from Orissaís Mayurbanj district worked with such astounding dedication and commitment that he would often submit 300 sketches instead of the required 10 every semester!

Even today, Jatin Das can work with astonishing speed. Painter, muralist, sculptor, and poet, he is celebrating 40 years of his creative works with a stunning exhibition of drawings and graphics.

" It was self imposed discipline as I wanted to become one of Indiaís best known artists," says Das, marvelling at how time has slipped by since he was a student at the countryís premier art institute. " I am still a student. Still learning the finer nuances of art. I still get excited whenever I see great art like that in Konarak, Khajuraho and Mahabalipuram."

An assiduously inventive artist of human figures in motion, Jatin Das is at his best depicting man-woman relationships. His human forms have a vibrant energy that depict an abundance of emotions. For him painting is an intensely personal experience. " Human predicament is my basic concern. I draw, paint and etch the human body, without any narrative, devoid of placement of time. The figures in my works do their own things," says Das.

To mark his four decades as an artist, a retrospective exhibition of his drawings was held at Delhiís All India Fine Arts & Crafts Society. The drawings are in ink, pencil and dry points on paper. It is a unique instance in an era where exhibitions of oil paintings are more dominant and popular.

" Is desh mein drawing ki exhibition koi nahin lagata," (In India no one puts up an exclusive exhibition of drawings) says a rueful Das, who has lectured on art in various universities all over the world.

Citing the Chitrasutra (a treatise on art) he says drawing is the essence of an artistís work. He himself draws with pen using Indian and Chinese inks to create stark chiselled figurations of black on white. Being an ardent admirer of this neglected art form in India, he feels sorry that it does not command the same respect here as it does in other parts of the world.

" You can gauge an artistís worth by his drawings. That is why this is such a popular art in most countries. But in India people seldom buy drawings and graphics. Here people buy only oil paintings because Indians have the mindset that anything done on canvas will last long."

 

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